TOR also called over $600 million to Ohtani, becoming a competitor to be reckoned with… Proving investment stance after RYU

The battle for Shohei Ohtani, 29, ended in a victory for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who paid an unprecedented “total of $700 million” (approximately $922.2 billion). But the Dodgers’ victory was far from comfortable.

“The Toronto Blue Jays’ final offer for Ohtani was similar to the Dodgers’, according to sources,” Canadian outlet Sportsnet reported on Nov. 11.

The day before, The Athletic, ESPN, and others reported that Ohtani had agreed to a 10-year, $700 million contract with the Dodgers. Ohtani himself announced the news on social media, saying, “To all my fans and everyone involved in baseball, I apologize for taking so long to make this decision. I have decided to choose the Los Angeles Dodgers as the next team I will play for.”월카지노

The Ohtani saga was one of the top stories on this year’s Major League Baseball (MLB) Storify. MLB.com, the official website of Major League Baseball, ESPN, The Athletic, Yahoo Sports, and other sports outlets have all ranked Ohtani at the top of their big league free agent lists this year. MLB.com has five tiers of free agents, and Ohtani is in the first tier. Only one other player was ranked in this tier.

Unsurprisingly, teams scrambled to sign him, but teams unable to afford his $600 million price tag backed out early, and ESPN reported that the big-market Texas Rangers, Boston Red Sox, and New York Mets turned to other free agents at the last minute, leaving the Dodgers, Toronto, Chicago Cubs, and the original Los Angeles Angels.

In the end, the Dodgers were the winners. Not only were they a finalist for Ohtani’s first tryout in the U.S. in late 2017, but they’re also one of the richest teams in the big leagues. “The Dodgers got the guy they’ve always wanted when they made a move on a guy,” one National League club executive told MLB.com. In the end, as he put it, the Dodgers made a bold bet and got a “unicorn” in Ohtani.

But just a day before Ohtani himself announced his destination, there was talk that Toronto was the favorite. MLB Network’s John Morosi confirmed the move on social media on Sept. 9, tweeting, “Otani will be flying to Toronto today.” However, it was later revealed that Ohtani had not flown to Toronto and Morosi apologized for the error.

Aside from these missteps, it was later revealed that the Jays were financially competitive with the Dodgers. According to Sportsnet, “Toronto’s final offer was on par with the Dodgers. Toronto made a very competitive offer,” Sportsnet reported. “While the exact amount was not disclosed, the fact that it was close to $700 million suggests that the ownership group was betting well over $600 million,” the outlet said.

“Toronto must have been seriously interested in Ohtani,” the source continued. Ohtani’s camp was pleased with Toronto’s unprecedented effort to involve the owners in negotiations.”

Of course, there are other voices. One is that Ohtani’s camp used Toronto to raise the ransom. “Some might say, ‘Ohtani was going to choose the Dodgers anyway, he was just trying to take advantage of Toronto,'” the outlet said, questioning, “Was Ohtani’s trip to Toronto’s spring training site in Dunedin, Florida, a genuine expression of interest, or was it a way to extract more money from the Dodgers?”

Regardless, the fact that Toronto was able to match the Dodgers’ “mega-deal” could be a positive going forward. While the Jays have a history of acquiring star players through trades, they’ve also made a big push into free agency, starting with Hyun-jin Ryu (four years, $80 million) at the end of 2019. At the time, Hyun-Jin Ryu’s deal was only the third of its kind, following Vernon Wells (seven years, $126 million) in 2006 and Russell Martin (five years, $82 million) in 2014, but the Jays have since signed George Springer (six years, $150 million), Kevin Gausman (five years, $110 million), and Jose Berrios (seven years, $131 million) in 2021.

The club’s willingness to invest this much money, as seen in the race to sign Ohtani, should be a positive for other players as well. It could also be a sign of confidence in their ability to hold onto players like Vladimir Guerrero Jr. and Beau Bichette who are up for extensions.

Toronto invested heavily after a 95-loss season in 2019 and experienced its first fall baseball in four years the following year, going 32-28 (.533 winning percentage) in a 60-game shortened season to earn an American League wild card spot. Since then, the Angels have consistently won over five games and reached the postseason for the second straight year last year and this year.
In six seasons with the Angels, he has played in 701 games as a hitter, batting .274 (2483-for-681) with 171 home runs, 437 RBI, 428 runs scored, 86 doubles, a .366 slugging percentage, a .556 on-base percentage, and a .922 OPS. On the mound, he started all 86 games, going 38-19 with a 3.01 ERA, 608 strikeouts in 481⅔ innings, 173 walks, and a 1.08 WHIP. He was the American League Rookie of the Year in 2018 and the league’s unanimous MVP in 2021 and this season. At the plate this season, he batted .304 with 44 home runs, 95 RBI, 102 runs scored, 20 doubles, a .412 on-base percentage, a .654 slugging percentage and a 1.066 OPS in 135 games, while on the mound, he went 10-5 with a 3.14 ERA and 167 strikeouts in 132 innings.

Ohtani’s $700 million contract is the largest in North American professional sports history. The previous record was a 10-year, $450 million deal for quarterback Patrick Mahomes from the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL) in 2020. In Major League Baseball, the previous record was a 12-year, $426.5 million extension signed by the Los Angeles Angels and Mike Trout ahead of the 2019 season, and in free agency alone, Aaron Judge’s nine-year, $360 million deal with the New York Yankees last year.

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